Slides

Where are we in the semester?

Week 1 / Jan 21: Getting Started & Internet Presence

Before class:

During class:

After class:

  • Write a substantive post on the potential uses and possible pitfalls of an online presence. Flesh out your site as you deem appropriate, and explain your choices in the blog post. Fill out this form so that I know where to find your blog.

Week 2 / Jan 28: Digital History & The Internet

Before class:

In class:

After class:

Week 3 / Feb. 4: Finding Information

Before class:

During class:

After class:

  • Anything that you want me to know?
  • What sources did you find? Use Zotero and correct Chicago citations to help you list them. What did you learn from reading these sources? After reading those sources, what direction might you take your final project? What did you learn about finding primary and secondary sources online?

Before class:

After class (pick one):

  • Add a copyright notice and, if you wish, an open-access license to your blog. (You should do this for every website you create in this course.)

  • Which level of copyright/open access have you selected for your blog? What do you plan to select for your final project? Why? What copyrights and licenses have been assigned to the sources you’ve used so far in this class? (Go back and look.) What potential limitations will you encounter for your final project?

  • Describe the results of your digital fast. What did you learn about attention and technology as a result of this experiment? How could you be a better user of both print and digital technologies?

Week 5 / Feb. 18 Feb. 25: Metadata & Omeka

Before class:

During class:

  • Install the SimplePages plugin and create an about page.
  • Create a metadata record for at least three of the sources that you have used so far.

Sample exhibits that we will discuss in class: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Sources that I will use in the class demonstration:

After class:

  • Anything that you want me to know?
  • What did you learn about metadata? What sources did you use to find metadata for your items? What kinds of fields are most significant for the sources you included? Include a link to your Omeka sites and the items that you added.

Week 6 / Feb. 25 March 4: Mapping 1

Before class:

  • Richard White, “What is Spatial History?
  • Stephen Robertson, “Putting Harlem on the Map,” Writing History in the Digital Age, edited by Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki (2012).
  • Sign up for an account at the David Rumsey map Collection. Pick at least one map of your city from the time period. Read the introduction to Georeferencing.
  • Sign up for a free account at CartoDB and look through the introduction.
  • Take the book you read about your city or any other source that you have found. Compile a list of at least five specific places in a spreadsheet. You should record the following kinds of information, each in a separate column: address, city, state, date, description, people or groups involved, page number, source. We will use this data in class.
  • Capital and Labor,” ch. 18 of The American Yawp.

During class:

After class:

  • Post the maps that you created. What did you learn by mapping the sources that you had already read? What were the challenges in creating the maps?

Week 7: Merged into other weeks due to snow

Week 8 / Mar. 18: Visualization

Before class:

During class:

After class:

  • Post your visualizations to your blog. Be sure to include titles and captions, with citations to the data. What did your visualizations show you that you didn’t see before? What kinds of literacy do your visualizations require?

Week 9 / Mar. 25: Text Mining

Before class:

During class:

  • Use Voyant to explore the set of texts provided.
  • Use Voyant to explore the data set that you created.

After class:

  • Post your best visualizations from Voyant. What did you learn from this distant reading of texts? How might this approach contribute to your final project?

Week 10 / Apr. 1: HTML; Security, Sustainability, and Ethics

Before class:

During class:

After class:

  • Use some of what you have learned about HTML and CSS to improve the pages at your final project.
  • What did you learn about web security? Who has access to your information? What is the significance of government surveillance? of corporate surveillance?

Week 11 / Apr. 8: Exhibits and Story Telling

Before class:

  • Yoni Appelbaum, “The Great Illusion of Gettysburg,” The Atlantic, February 5, 2012.
  • Find five photos from your time period and city. Arrange them to tell a story. Sketch out the text that could connect them.
  • Install the ExhibitBuilder plugin on your Omeka site, and read through the tutorial.

During class:

  • Begin creating a test exhibit of the materials that you have gathered so far.

After class:

  • What is the narrative arc of the exhibit you will create for your final project? What techniques of digital storytelling do you wish to incorporate? What materials will you have to gather in your research?

Week 12 / Apr. 15: Programming

Before class:

During class:

  • Experiment with programming in R.

After class:

  • You have read admonitions to learn to code and reasons why not to. Now that you have actually coded a bit, what do you think? What did you learn about algorithmic literacy?

Week 13 / Apr. 22 & Week 14 / Apr. 29: Presentations

Before class:

After you’ve given your presentation:

  • What did you learn about giving a presentation? Were you boring? What were the main points that you wanted to communicate? Did you get them across? How did your visuals help or hinder.